Monitoring a Changing World

Frequent Monitoring of Natural Resources and Management of Natural Disasters with Airbus Defence and Space’s Constellation

We live in an age of unprecedented challenges. Our growing need for food, water and energy is driving a rapidly changing global dynamic. Global warming has proved to be highly impacting over the last decades. Indeed, greenhouse gases are increasing at an alarming rate, the average temperature is climbing and sea levels are rising by 3mm per year. Climate change is a reality, with repercussions that can be seen worldwide, from earthquakes and tsunamis to cyclones and flooding.

Satellites are key interveners as they provide the data that enables scientists to confirm the degree of change and to track its impact. Satellite systems and their applications are crucial to the development of best practices for monitoring the environment.

SPOT – Lake Tuz, Turkey

SPOT – Lake Tuz, Turkey

TerraSAR-X – Makran Desert, Pakistan

TerraSAR-X – Makran Desert, Pakistan

Pléiades – Sinabung volcano, Sumatra

Pléiades – Sinabung volcano, Sumatra

Since the launch of our very first satellite SPOT 1, we have been monitoring climate change over the Earth’s surface and its impact on our planet. We have witnessed significant evolutions in our natural environment, but our images and services have also contributed to the Earth’s conservation.

When it comes to improving lives around the World, Airbus Defence and Space provides you with a unique opportunity to address the key global challenges and identify opportunities to help safeguard the Earth. We provide what you need – when you need it: wide coverage, fine detail, intensive monitoring, reliable and successful new collections, fresh and extensive archives, premium reactivity, and much more.

Learn how we helped our partners and customers, including NGOs, institutional entities and economic actors, support the protection of our environment and wild life through better intelligence.

The international political response to climate change began at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, where the ‘Rio Convention’ included the adoption of the UN Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The UNFCCC now has a near-universal membership of 195 parties. In December 2015, COP21, also known as the 2015 Paris Climate Conference, will aim to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate, with keeping global warming below 2°C.

Monitoring a Changing World